Real World Language Mistakes, Volume 5

How’s your Geography?

Sunday Times, Travel supplement, 24/11/2013:The article featured a holiday to the Amalfi Coast on Italy’s Tyrrhenian Sea. The writer was describing – in the present tense to bring the reader into the moment, so to speak – the villa in which
the family had stayed : ‘… with views across to Positano. Twisting steps lead down to the Adriatic [sic] (Sea).’

THE TERRIBLE TWOs!

The Irish Times, 07/12/2013: Re: Soccer World Cup Draw in Brazil‘Mr Blatter made a none-to-subtle appeal for no repeat of the protests that overshadowed last year’s …’

The words to, too and two are frequently misused.

two: refers to the number 2

too: means

  • also, as in ‘I’m going too.’
  • extremely, as in ‘I’m too tired.’
  • more than is required as in, ‘There are too many children on the bus.’

to: is used practically everywhere else as in… to the shop, …from one to
six, … about to leave, … to be or not to be, …must show my medal to
my cousins, etc.

My two cousins and I were too young to go to school on our own, too.

By the way, Mr Blatter’s appeal was, indeed, none-too-subtle.

Don’t be late!

A sign on the door of a restaurant in University College Cork reads:

Opening Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 18 p.m.

(Write either 8:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. or 08:30 to 18:00.)

Of all the mistakes to make . . .!

An event called Stars, Choirs and Carols was held in Croke Park in Dublin on 19/12/2013. The
concert was an attempt to break the record – for inclusion in the Guinness Book of Records – for the
number of carol singers performing together in one venue. Due to a change in the stage location, the
original tickets were dispensed with and new ones were issued instead. Written on the new ticket was:
‘The organisers of [sic] asked us to seat you in a new position to ensure that you have a full view of events.’

(‘The organisers have asked us …’)

Half and halve!

A large advertising billboard in a field adjacent to the motorway between Cork and Dublin reads:
HALF [sic] YOUR HEATING COSTS THIS WINTER’. (HALVE)

In this case, the noun half was incorrectly used instead of the verb halve.

You’ll never beat the Irish!

The Irish (language) word for an Irish-language school is gaelscoil.

According to www.independent.ie, the damage caused to an Irish-language school in the post-Christmas
(2013) storm resulted from ‘gael-force winds’. This misspelling could easily blow up a gale!


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Top 20 Mistakes in Everyday English
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Real World Language Mistakes, Volume 4

Apostrophobia Saga! Irish Examiner, SPORT supplement, Monday, 24/02/2014: 'The Cork man, who played scrum half for Ireland and is assistant...

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